Keep Buggering On – or, Writer’s Block Sucks

What’s that episode of Doctor Who where Capaldi beats his way out of the icewall surrounding the castle? (It’s a good’un, as well).

Sometimes, writing feels like that – you’re making progress, but it’s really slow and all the remorseless keyboard-beating just hurts your hands.

Walk, cup of tea, keep buggering on, don’t edit as you go, walk, cup of tea…

But you try to go forwards, and slam! Your hands hit the wall, again.

Walk, cup of tea…

We’ve had two articles in the Guardian recently, one from the woman who wrote two novels and quit, and then the response from David Barnett, about how you’ve got to be tough with this stuff, so deal with it. And speaking as someone who did quit and then took it back up again, I feel deeply for both of them.

This week, quitting would be so easy. And keeping going is so hard.

Walk, cup of tea…

But the mark of a writer is not success. Don’t get me wrong – the accolades are great – but they’re not what makes the woman. The writer is one who writes, because they have to. The images, the characters, the imaginary things in your head – they won’t leave you alone. And yes, you need to be tough – and every time you bruise your knuckles on that icewall, it’s another tiny crack.

Walk, cup of tea…

I keep telling myself that the wall will come down. I just hope it doesn’t take me as long as it took the Doctor.

 

 

 

 

Doctor Who in Comics

For something so huge, it really isn’t very big; you can walk round it in under 15 minutes. But the artwork is beautiful, and it’ll take you through time – from 1964 right up to the present day.

You can see how a Doctor Who comics story evolves from script to finished page, follow the roles played by writer, editor, penciller, inker and colour artist. For those who’ve never read the magazine, this display introduces worlds and adventures that you never knew existed – holes in space-time that show something amazing…

The Doctor is comics form may be ever better than he is on screen.

This is a whole new Universe, a side of the Doctor that I’ve been aware of but never really explored and that was completely new to my Who-mad son. And we both loved it.

I couldn’t take too many pictures and was wary of infringing anyone’s copyright; the stuff I’ve shown here is only the smallest taste of the wonders on display. It’s suitably TARDIS-like – very much bigger on the inside.

But don’t take my world for it – go down and find out where the boundaries of space-time really are.

Doctor Who in Comics 1964 – 2011, exhibit at the Cartoon Museum.